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‘I don’t want to get like a Disney Film’ Edwin Burdis at Primary

Sun 28th September, 2014 @ 5:14pm by thefreshmeatgallery

There is something very inspiring and refreshing about artist Edwin Burdis. It’s possibly the fact that he is not from a traditional, art focused background. Or perhaps it’s due to how he speaks his mind, saying what he wants to say and not what he thinks others might want to hear. Either way, both Burdis’ opinions and his work are a welcome refresher to the art world. Having completed half of his residency at Primary already, Burdis’ own commission – the second in a series of commissioned works entitled “Multiple Points in This Crude Landscape” – is set to open for one month from October 1st.

Edwin Burdis

With a past in producing dance tracks, Burdis has now translated his talent in sampling from other sources, into the artwork that he creates; which is inspired by everything from “books and films”, to “music and the internet.” This explains perfectly how each piece of Burdis’ work continues to be a successfully eclectic mix of every possible medium and colour imaginable. However, interestingly enough, the colours that Burdis uses are something that “just happen”, other than lilac that is, which has a way of seeping into his work due to his Mothers’ influence. While the materials and colours of the work are of significance, Burdis also considers the viewers to be just as important, stating “They are always a part of it, even if they are just looking at it.” Before adding, “I don’t think work exists if it’s not being seen or heard.” This is one of the many refreshing attitudes of Burdis as an artist, whatever he produces he tries to get it out there and seen by as many people as possible, and he encourages others to work in the same kind of way.

Having taught in Higher Education recently, Burdis was saddened to discover so many art students relying so heavily on the validation of others that they become almost un-ambitious. Burdis also found that some students were focusing too much on their “Am I doing the right thing” attitude which he considers – and quite rightly so – “kind of, a load of rubbish.” However, as surprising as it is, when asked if he had any advice for recent graduates hoping to become practicing artists themselves Burdis replied with, “I can’t. I can’t, I’d dread to say the wrong thing. I have no advice.” This is a surprising outcome, not due to the fact that Burdis seemed to be lacking the advice or wisdom for others to learn from, but because the entirety of the rest of the interview consisted mostly of advice that Burdis seemingly didn’t know he was giving.

“It’s up to you. You’ve got this moment. I don’t want to get like a Disney film, but this is the moment and that’s all you’ve got. It’s time. Just time. Forget about the rest of it because it’s gonna go. So, just get on with it. Make stuff.”

Burdis, with his non-traditional background, and his truthful and open approach to interviewing in check; he has given some of the best advice we’ve ever had the privilege of achieving through an interview. Starting very simply with the points that, “it’s really important to fail”, and that it is up to you as the artist to “get out there and do it” – Burdis began with the advice as he – apparently unknowingly -aimed to go on. The epitome of Burdis’ interview, and perhaps even his work also, comes down to one epiphany like piece of advice; “It’s up to you. You’ve got this moment. I don’t want to get like a Disney film, but this is the moment and that’s all you’ve got. It’s time. Just time. Forget about the rest of it because it’s gonna go. So, just get on with it. Make stuff.”

[source freshmeatgallery.com]

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